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Area Attractions

Telowie Gorge, a few kilometers to the east, is open all year round and has some fantastic scenery from the walking trails. Read More...
 
Mambray Creek to the north has a great BBQ area and various walking trails to suit your abilities. Read More...
 
When the tide is in, Port Germein has one of the safest beaches to swim. No stingers and no big currents to sweep you away. Read More...
 

Welcome to The Heritage of Port Germein

Port Germein has a rich heritage and history that should not be lost. The port with it's jetty was a foundation stone for our state and certainly a gateway for the expansion of settlement in the area.

This website is to preserve the memories and artefacts of the era, with a complete catalogue of items gathered for the museum.

There are also codes on information plaques around the town, and with the free app, you can listen to facts about the area on your mobile device.

The online Museum offers a truly multimedia experience with Links to external items that show things to see and do in the area, and our own store of Soundbites, stories and poems that can not be found anywhere else. (Please contact us for usage)

  • Port Germein is a small sea-side town situated 27 km to the north of Port Pirie on the eastern side of South Australia's Spencer Gulf. Port Germein was named after Samuel Germein, who discovered it in 1840, though some credit his brother John with the discovery. The township was proclaimed in 1878. Port Germein's population in the 2006 census was 249.

    Originally named "Hummock Harbour",[5] Port Germein was once an important transport hub for the surrounding districts following the opening of its jetty in 1881 – at the time known as the longest jetty in the Southern Hemisphere. Due to the shallow water along the coast, the long jetty was built to allow sailing ships to be loaded with grain from surrounding districts. Bagged wheat came from the local area, the eastern side of the Southern Flinders Ranges via Port Germein Gorge (opened in 1879), and from the west coast in smaller boats. About 100,000 bags of wheat were loaded per year. The jetty was extended to its full length of 1680m in 1883.[6] With the opening of the port came an influx of workers from Adelaide, and by 1900 the town's population had grown to over 300.(Wikipedia)

  • How to get to Port Germein

    Port Germein has a fairly unique name, so it's a pretty safe bet that if you entered Port Germein into your GPS, this is where you would end up.
    There are some other methods that we have seen used successfully!
    One is to get onto Highway 1 from anywhere in Australia and head either clockwise or anti-clockwise. Of course you have a 50/50 chance of taking either the long way or the short way. Trouble is, If you get it wrong, you may be making a 14,000 kilometre mistake. Yes.... The longest Highway in the world... but you can't get lost :-)
    33.0212° S, 137.9992° E is a really safe bet too. Doesn't matter where you start, there is only one location like this on the planet.
     

    Sailing Boat? No problem, just go along the cost till you get to the longest jetty you’ve ever seen ... that's us!

  • Multi Media Links about Port Germein

    Walking the Jetty

     

    From the Air

     

    See the Dolphins

     

    Storm 2009

     

    Port Germein Train

  • Make it your destination or just going past?

    Port Germein is a great place to stay, even for just a few days.
    And there is lots to do in the area as well.
    The Caravan park has all the required amenities. including Wifi Internet and is directly across from the beach. www.portgermein.com.au

     

News Around Pt. Germein

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History

Originally named "Hummock Harbour", Port Germein was once an important transport hub for the surrounding districts following the opening of its jetty in 1881 – at the time known as the longest jetty in the Southern Hemisphere. Due to the shallow water along the coast, the long jetty was built to allow sailing ships to be loaded with grain from surrounding districts. Bagged wheat came from the local area, the eastern side of the Southern Flinders Ranges via Port Germein Gorge (opened in 1879), and from the west coast in smaller boats. About 100,000 bags of wheat were loaded per year. The jetty was extended to its full length of 1680m in 1883. (Wikipedia2016)